In other news...
zebablah:

terrakion:

policymic:

Dreamworks is doing something even Pixar hasn’t tried: A black female heroine

DreamWorks Animation Studios has announced the addition of a black female heroine (gasp!) to its repertoire of white dogs, green ogres, snails, Neanderthals, pandas, white people and Antz. In doing so, it joins an elite club consisting of … well, nobody.
Not one major Hollywood studio has released a 3D animated feature starring a black character.
Read more | Follow policymic


SHES VOICED BY RIHANNA

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zebablah:

terrakion:

policymic:

Dreamworks is doing something even Pixar hasn’t tried: A black female heroine

DreamWorks Animation Studios has announced the addition of a black female heroine (gasp!) to its repertoire of white dogs, green ogres, snails, Neanderthals, pandas, white people and Antz. In doing so, it joins an elite club consisting of … well, nobody.

Not one major Hollywood studio has released a 3D animated feature starring a black character.

Read more | Follow policymic

SHES VOICED BY RIHANNA

WELPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPP

ami-angelwings:


badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.
The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.
The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 
For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.

The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.

The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 

For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

We are the k i n g s 
We are the q u e e n s

calikocat:

tonytimelovings:

“i don’t want to write this fanfic i want to fucking read it”

— a novel not written by me (via kingxxxwizard)

Every fanfic I’ve ever written.

A Mutology Pitch Post

fantasticfakemon:

Really interesting card game that is currently in development and heading for Kickstarter soon!

mutology:

 Hello everyone! I’ve been developing this card game since March 2013 and I’ve just recently discovered this forum. Wanted to write a bit about where I’m at. The graphic design is not 100% nailed down, as you’ll probably be able to tell; playtesting has gone on and on and I’ve received a good amount of feedback. Manufacturers have been contacted and I’ve begun to set up a business plan to see how I can self-publish the game. Here’s the pitch:

 Mutology is a brand new strategy card game that transforms players into Mutologists, bioengineers obsessed with creating extraordinary creatures in their laboratories. Players will fire Radiation cards at their Specimens, and depending on what combinations of Radiation they’re exposed to, Specimens will turn into one of two unique Mutants. Some Mutants are hyper aggressive, others have defense mechanisms, and some manipulate the way you or your opponent can play the game! You collect Research Points at the start of each turn for every Mutant you have in your Field zone, and the first player to 10 points wins.

image

 Players mutate their Specimens by firing one of three kinds of Radiation, (Alpha, Beta, and Gamma Rays) at their Specimen cards. Each Specimen card comes with a unique ingredient list called "mutation requirements." Alone, Radiation cards give perks to the Specimen such as boosting their Power or Stability. Whenever a Specimen has met one of its mutation requirements, they would mutate into the corresponding Mutant card, which would wait outside of play until this moment.

 Here is an example of a Specimen card, bound to change its graphic design. You’ll see the Radiation symbols underneath the “Experiment” titles. Each Mutant is given an Experiment number like this, and the Specimens are labeled with a letter of the alphabet.

 I’ve reach out to PandaGM, ADmagic, WinGO, and one or two other manufacturers to see how I could possibly make a Kickstarter campaign to print and ship these cards out. I believe that the game is unique because it allows players to be very flexible with how they create their monsters: there are guidelines to get them started but they can really take it in a few different directions. I know I’ve never played two games that were even close to being the same.

image

 Its also not just a simple “kill everything in play” sort of game. You could build an aggressive deck, sure. But you can also build a deck that uses Mutants that have special defense mechanisms instead, or build a strategy that gathers victory points very quickly. Its really a game meant for people who like to find interesting ways to a win condition.

 Components include d10 which is used to track your Concentration, which is the currency value you spend to take actions like playing Radiation or Procedure cards from your hand, etc. There’s also going to be tokens or dice used to track damage: still trying to find the most cost-effective way to do this.

 Apart from Specimens and Mutants, player can build Devices like the Electric Coil and the Transmogrifier, or use Procedures like Stroke of Genius and Extraction. Lab Assistants like the Medic, Technician, and Researcher can lend their talents to you throughout the game as well. There are two zones of play in which cards can be placed: the Field zone and the Lab zone. These cards behave differently in each zone, so Mutology games always have a bit of tactical placement strategy involved.

image

  Up here you can see how the grid pattern looks, with the Field zone in the frontline and the Lab zone behind it. Cards placed in your Lab zone cannot be targeted for attack, but their abilities are turned off: they’re basically on the bench. Cards in the Field zone can be attacked but they’re able to fight back, and their abilities can be utilized. You’ll only collect Research Points for Mutants in your Field zone, so you’d need to decide when’s the best time to unleash your creations and when to keep them hidden away.

 If there’s any more interest in this, I’d be happy to elaborate. I know I’m having a blast designing it and seeing how people play the game. Below is some more art from the game. Facebook group.  Design blog.  Pending Youtube and BGG page. 

dduane:

alchery:

heysawbones:

alliartist:

music-holic:

And the Waltz Goes On - Anthony Hopkins 

Sir Anthony Hopkins Hears The Waltz He Wrote 50 Years Ago For The First Time

Academy Award-winning actor Sir Anthony Hopkins was a musician before he got into acting. 50 years ago he wrote a waltz but was too afraid to ever hear it play. Dutch violinist André Rieu performs it for the very first time. Watch Hopkins’ reaction.

That was beautiful

I cried a few tears and felt better about humanity’s endeavors.

That as absolutely spectacular and ornate. I as well was brought to tears

Screw the article links for the moment: this is too extraordinary not to reblog right now.

Hopkins’s reactions as it plays through would have been worth the entire price of admission. And whoever did the orchestration should be congratulated for not going for anything small. (But then Rieu’s shindigs always lean toward the spectacular anyway: “small” would be out of place.)

…Whew.

That is some beautiful music.

Reblog this if you can read a hand clock

askhumanitestitanlover:

image

just curious

dcwomenkickingass:

Well Disney DOES Own Marvel

An alternative ending to Frozen that maximizes the Disney assets and brings us a super-ending.